Week 4 – Annotated Bibliographies

Bernacki, M. L., Byrnes, J. P., & Cromley, J. G. (2012). The effects of achievement goals and self-regulated learning behaviors on reading comprehension in technology-enhanced learning environments. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 37(2), 148-161. doi:10.1016/j.cedpsych.2011.12.001

Blackwell, C., Lauricella, A., & Wartella, E. (2014). Factors influencing digital technology use in early childhood education. Computers and Education, 82-90.

Chen, C., & Chen, F. (2014). Enhancing digital reading performance with a collaborative reading annotation system. Computers & Education, 67-81

Chu, H. (2014). Potential negative effects of mobile learning on students’ learning achievement and cognitive load – a format assessment perspective. Educational Technology and Society, 17(1), 332-344.

Fante, R., Jacobi, L. L., & Sexton, V. D. (2013). The Effects of Instant Messaging and Task Difficulty on Reading Comprehension. North American Journal Of Psychology, 15(2), 287-298.

Hadjerrouit, S. (2010). Developing web-based learning resources in school education: A user-centered approach. Interdisciplinary Journal of E-learning and Learning Objectives, 6.

Lysenko, L., & Abrami, P. (2014). Promoting reading comprehension with the use if technology. Computers and Education, 162-172.

Ponce, H., Mayer, R., & Lopez, M. (2013). A computer-based spatial learning strategy approach that improves reading comprehension and writing. Educational Technology Research & Development, 61(5), 819-840. doi:10.1007/s11423-013-9310-9

Wijekumar, K., Meyer, B. F., & Lei, P. (2013). High-fidelity implementation of web-based intelligent tutoring system improves fourth and fifth graders content area reading comprehension. Computers & Education, 68366-379. doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2013.05.021

Yanghee, K. (2013). Digital Peers to Help Children’s Text Comprehension and Perceptions. Journal Of Educational Technology & Society, 16(4), 59-70

 Annotated Bibliographies

Blackwell, C., Lauricella, A., & Wartella, E. (2014). Factors influencing digital technology use in early childhood education. Computers and Education, 82-90.

Factors influencing digital technology use in early childhood education studies the factors that affect the use of technology among early childhood educators. Researchers took many factors into consideration including – first order barriers: SES of the students, school policy, school support, attitude and second-order barriers: teaching experience and teacher confidence in technology. They hypothesized the second order barriers were dependent on first-order barriers.

Survey data from 1234 early childhood educators was collected using a likert scale. The findings showed that all factors largely affected the use of technology among early childhood classrooms. Attitude was the leading factor followed by support, confidence, technology policy, and teaching experience. The study is concluded by stating that in order to integrate technology teachers must have proper support.

This article is relevant to those studying technology in early childhood education and puts an emphasis on the importance of support. The research data was difficult to follow. With surveys being the form of data collection it seems that it would not be the most accurate way of investigating this topic, classroom observations would help with the accuracy. Over all this was a good article for the topic being studied.

Lysenko, L., & Abrami, P. (2014). Promoting reading comprehension with the use if technology. Computers and Education, 162-172.

International comparisons show that even after years of school large numbers of children are not good readers. This study investigates two web based applications and their effect on elementary students. One application being an interactive, web based app called ABRA and the other a digital process portfolio called ePearl. The issue being faced is the lack of knowledge on how to promote reading comprehension.

Two studies were done, study 1 in 2010-2011 and study 2 in 2011-2012. The first study utilized 38 teachers and 748 1st and 2nd grade students; the second study utilized 9 teachers (4 previous and 5 new) and 381 students. Vocabulary and comprehension both benefitted from the programs, but listening comprehension did not. The use of these technology systems brought in class literacy time up to approximately 20 hours verses 9 hours that were being given to literacy in the control classrooms.

This is a fabulous article on the use of technology. The process of the study was clearly stated as well as the findings. I would highly recommend this study to those researching the benefits of technology in the classroom.

Chu, H. (2014). Potential negative effects of mobile learning on students’ learning achievement and cognitive load – a format assessment perspective. Educational Technology and Society, 17(1), 332-344.

This study looks into the effects of mobile technology use on learning. With the growing use of mobile technology students have the ability to learn in a variety of locations. This research studies whether this technology may actually be harming students learning achievement and cognitive load.

Two fifth grade classes were used in the study along with a unit on indigenous cultures. Students were given a “set of learning targets in a real world environment” (335). If the incorrect answer was given they were prompted to find the information on their own. Pre-tests and post-tests were given to measure the effectiveness of the program. The pre-test showed no real difference between the control group and the experimental group and the post-test showed the control group achieved higher scores than that of the group using mobile devices.

This was a very informative study and the researched was delivered wonderfully. The information on the research process as well as the finding was presented in an understandable and detailed manner. I would recommend this article

Hadjerrouit, S. (2010). Developing web-based learning resources in school education: A user-centered approach. Interdisciplinary Journal of E-learning and Learning Objectives, 6.

This study investigates web based learning resources (WBLR) and the potential they have to help students excel in the classroom. It focuses on the user-centered approach to create these WBLR’s in order to make them more effective. The article contains three literature reviews concerning the concept of WBLR, development issues, and Pedagogical Usability.

First, the aspects of user-centered development are reviewed: Analysis, design, metaphor, user interface design, architecture design, user feedback, and rapid prototyping. Three user-centered WBLR’s were created for 3 groups of students, 65 students ages 14-16. The perceptions of the students and teachers were reviewed. It was concluded that the use of WBLR’s is largely beneficial as long as the teachers are possess the skills needed to produce the programs.

This is a great article that is packed full of information regarding user-centered WBLR’s. I would have like to see a larger experimental group as it was small and limited to a three year age range. Overall this is a good source of information to get started on research dealing with WBLR’s.

Chen, C., & Chen, F. (2014). Enhancing digital reading performance with a collaborative reading annotation system. Computers & Education, 67-81.

This study researched the effects of digital reading. There is concern that digital reading “leads to shallow reading, short attention spans, and poor comprehension” (67), early studies have confirmed this. The study was done using two 5th grade classes using a collaborative reading annotation system and interactive discussion scaffold (CRAS-RAIDS). Three different variables were assessed: reading attitude, reading comprehension, and reading strategy. The control group used paper based collaborative reading and interacted using writing and face-to-face discussion. The experimental group used CRAS_RAIDS and had access to six interactive discussion scaffolds and was able o access the annotations of their peers.

Two experienced teachers evaluated the students. The annotations were separated into two categories; the experimental group contained almost double the number of discussion posts as the control group. Reading comprehension was measure using pre-tests and post-tests. Again, the experimental group scored higher in the posttest then the control group.

This is a wonderful study. It is thorough and informative and offers numerous statistical charts to back up the information. I would definitely recommend this article to someone who is researching how to improve reading comprehension with technology.

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